2 refrigerators on 1 circuit (page 1 from 2)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RdNWY3c_WQI

Stanley 20-556 6-Inch FatMax Jab Saw - Drywall Saw - Amazon.com: http://amzn.to/1tv0JK4 Leviton 16342-W 20-Amp, 125-Volt, Decora Plus Duplex Receptacle, Stra...

http://ths.gardenweb.com/discussions/2642054/does-a-refrigerator-need-to-be-on-a-separate-circuit

Does a refrigerator need to be on a separate circuit?

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/electrical-ac-dc/322428-refrigerator-freezer-same-circuit.html

Hi all, I currently have a refrigerator and a deep freezer plugged into the same receptacle. Is it code to have a basement frig and freezer on

https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20110805084321AAoAlUs

I am finishing off a small area of my basement and laying out the wiring plan right now. I expect to have four plugins... one of them will be for a fridge. It just so happens that this area is right below my existing kitchen. The fridge up there is on a circuit that is shared with one plugin in the dining room. This house was built in 2008 and I'm not sure why that one plugin was run off of this circuit. About half of the basement was finished off and wired by the builder. It would be really easy to just extend that kitchen fridge circuit to cover my four plugins in the basement. As mentioned, one of those plugins will be for a fridge. The other three will be used for lamps, vacuum, etc... if at all. My question(s) get down to this.... is it a good idea to extend that circuit?? is it ok to have two fridges on the one circuit? where do I look... or how do I compute the capacity of a circuit? I have done quite a bit of wiring over the years, so am comfortable running wire and installing plugs. But, I would have to get an electrician to put a new circuit breaker into the panel. Thanks - John

http://michaelbluejay.com/electricity/maxload.html

I'm trying to determine how many amps I'm putting on a circuit so I don't overload it, but I'm having a hard time understanding the labels. As with wall outlets, it's not the number of items you plug into a strip or extension cord that's the problem, it's the total amount of electricity they draw. The second possibility is that when the final server or two is switched on the brief power surge when the equipment is turned on is enough to exceed the 15-amp rating of the strip. The surge you get when you turn on equipment is so brief and so small that you'll never see its effect on your electric bill, but sometimes it's enough to trip a power strip or circuit breaker.

http://www.city-data.com/forum/house/2204138-20-amp-circuit-load-2.html

Most laundry outlets are NOT GFCI! Only the most recent version of the NEC has started requiring GFCI protection in places they were not previously

https://www.reddit.com/r/electricians/comments/2t8b5u/appliances_that_can_be_added_to_outlet_circuit_of/

I'm rewiring my kitchen and would like to know what (if any) appliances can safely be combined to the wall outlets? I have a gas stove with...

http://www.justanswer.com/electrical/3omrx-plug-two-refrigerators-in-garage-designated.html

Question - Can I plug in two refrigerators(in my garage) on the same designated - 31. Find the answer to this and other Electrical questions on JustAnswer.

http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/archive/index.php/t-279659.html

[Archive] Why can't I plug my microwave into the same outlet as my refridgerator? General Questions

https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20121121173312AAMI9Z5

You just need to add the rating on the label, UL requires these numbers to be consumer usable. Up to 100% is acceptable in this application, NEC 80% rules apply to loads that run for 3 hours or longer, those appliance don't run for three hours at a time. Breakers are designed keep the wire from overheating and operate on an "inverse time curve" for instance a 20 amp breaker can hold 100 amps for 7 seconds and still be within UL and NEMA specs. The kind of inrush these appliances draw for such short intervals will not overheat and melt the wire insulation.

http://www.theiet.org/forums/forum/messageview.cfm?catid=205&threadid=36701

Personally i think you would be pushing it on the cable size especially if it is an oldish installation, and each appliance should have a point of isolation separate from the cooker switch. Quoting 4.4 of the electricians guide to the building regs: The rating of the circuit is determined by the assessment of the current demand of the cooking appliance(s), and ccu socket-outlet if any. I'm waiting for confirmation but I would expect the microwave to be a combi, incorporating a grill and conventional oven, and poss a fan. Bod, the same immersion and 1.0mm cable arguement is a task on the design course classwork to prove it will or wont either way dependant on factors.

http://jadelearning.com/jadecc/courses/UNIVERSAL/NEC05.php?imDif=2118

Refrigerator not required to be included on the small appliance circuit.

http://www.ehow.com/info_12183197_can-plug-two-refrigerators-one-outlet.html

Can I Plug Two Refrigerators Into One Outlet?. The recommendation for outlet usage for refrigerators is based on manufacturer guidelines, as well as electrical codes. To avoid problems, it's advisable to follow any rules set by codes or as specified in the owner's manual. Otherwise, the refrigerators may not operate correctly; incorrect use may...

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/archive/index.php/t-94478.html

[Archive] 1 Freezer, 1 Refrigerator, 1 Garage Wall Socket? Q-talk

http://homeguides.sfgate.com/many-outlets-can-placed-20-amp-household-circuit-82633.html

The circuit breakers in the electrical panel in your house are safety devices. Each one is designed to disconnect power when the current passing through the circuit exceeds its rating. This prevents ...

http://electrical.about.com/od/wiringcircuitry/a/circuitsremodelingkitchen.htm

If you are remodeling your kitchen, you will need to be sure these ciruits are in place.

http://www.stripersonline.com/surftalk/topic/204104-does-a-kitchen-refridgerator-require-a-seperate-breaker/

Page 1 of 2 - Does a kitchen refridgerator require a seperate breaker? - posted in Do It Yourself: Re-doing my kitchen. Part of this will entail buying a new fridge and putting it in a new location. Someone mentioned that they "thought" that I would need a seperate breaker for the fridge. Anyone know if that is true? If so, should it be GFI? I dont believe it has its own breaker right now. House is 11 years old. Thanks.

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Homebrewing beer discussion forums. A very popular site with many knowledgable regulars ready to answer ANY question.

http://www.familyhandyman.com/electrical/preventing-electrical-overloads/view-all

Electrical overloads can be dangerous. In this article, we'll explain how electrical circuits work, how to figure out which outlets are on which circuit, and how to avoid overloading them. We'll explain the electrical system in a way that DIYers can easily understand.

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